Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International Conference on Smart Materials & Structures Philadelphia,Pennsylvania, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Elias Siores

University of Bolton, UK

Keynote: Fibre structures for energy harvesting in wearables

Time : 10:00 - 10:40

OMICS International Smart Materials 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Elias Siores photo
Biography:

Elias Siores is the Provost and Director of Research and Innovation, Bolton University. Educated in the UK (BSc, MSC, MBA, PhD) and pursued his academic career in Australia (Sydney, Brisbane and Melbourne) and Asia (Hong Kong, Dong Guan) before returning to Europe (UK) as a Marie Curie Fellow. He is also President, Board of Governors, TEI – Athens and Director of Innovation, FibrLec Ltd. His R&D work concentrated on advancing the science and technology in the field of automated Non-Destructive Testing and Evaluation including Ultrasound, Acoustic Emission, and Microwave Thermography. His recent R&D work focuses on Smart / Functional Materials and Systems development. In this area, he has developed Electromagnetic, Electrorheological, Photovoltaic and Piezoelectric Smart Materials based Energy Conversion Systems for Renewable Energy, Medical, Health Care and Wearable Devices. He has published over 300 publications including 8 Patents . He has been a member of editorial boards of international journals and a Fellow of IOM, TWI, IEAust, SAE and WTIA. He has served on Board of Directors of a number of research centres worldwide including UK, Australia, Singapore and Hong Kong, all associated with the Bio-Nano-Materials field. He is a member of the Parliamentary Scientific Committee and has received 15 international awards in his career for R&D and innovation achievements.

Abstract:

The piezoelectric effect in Poly(vinylidene fluoride), PVDF, has been utilised in the development of fibres and their integration into fabric structures for energy harvesting. A “3D spacer” technology based all-fibre piezoelectric fabrics as power generators and energy harvesters is presented. The knitted single-structure piezoelectric generator consists of high β-phase (~80%) piezoelectric PVDF monofilaments as the spacer yarn interconnected between silver (Ag) coated polyamide 66 multifilament yarn layers acting as electrodes. The novel and unique textile structure provides an output power density in the range of 1.10 - 5.10 μWcm-2 at applied impact pressures in the range of 0.02 - 0.10 MPa, providing significantly higher power outputs and efficiencies over the existing 2D woven and nonwoven piezoelectric structures. The method of producing high quality piezoelectric yarn and piezoelectric fabric provides an effective option for the development of high performance energy-harvesting textile structures for electronic devices that could be charged from ambient environment or by human movement. Furthermore, via the creation of hybrid photovoltaic films and fibres, energy can be captured from solar radiation and used where the mechanical impetus is absent. The high energy efficiency, mechanical durability and comfort of the soft, flexible and all-fibre based power generator is highly attractive for a variety of potential applications such as wearable electronic systems and energy harvesters charged from ambient environment or by human movement.

Keynote Forum

K M Liew

City University of Hong Kong

Keynote: Carbon nanotube reinforced functionally graded composites

Time : 10:40 - 11:20

OMICS International Smart Materials 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker K M Liew photo
Biography:

K M Liew is the Head of Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering and Chair Professor of Civil Engineering, City University of Hong Kong. He was a tenured Professor at Nanyang Technological University (Singapore) and the Founding Director of Nanyang Center for Supercomputing and Visualization. Over his academic career, he has published over 650 SCI journal articles. He is listed by the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) as a Highly Cited Researcher in engineering. His publications have been cited over twenty thousand times and his current h-index is 56 (ISI) or 68 (Google Scholar).

Abstract:

It is widely accepted that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an advanced material possessing high strength and stiffness as well as a high aspect ratio and low density. Research findings have reported the remarkable physical and mechanical properties of CNTs, making them a strong candidate for the reinforcements in polymer composites. The axial Young's modulus of single-walled carbon nanotube arrays with diameters ranging from nanometer to meter scales. The mechanical properties of CNTs are superior to those of carbon fibers. In recent studies, CNTs have been designed to be uniaxially aligned in an axial direction following the functionally graded pattern, leading to a new class of composite material – that is, the CNT reinforced functionally graded composite material. This CNT-reinforced composite can be used in the form of beam, plate or shell structural components. Because of their use in a variety of structures, studies of their mechanical behavior, in terms of bending, buckling, vibration, large deformation, postbuckling and large amplitude vibration have received considerable attention. In this talk, the effects of various geometric and material parameters on the mechanical behavior of CNT reinforced functionally graded structures will be presented.

Break: Refreshments Break @ Foyer 11:20 - 11:40
  • Smart Materials & Structural Engineering
Location: Independence B
Speaker

Chair

Rashid Rashidzadeh

University of Windsor, Canada

Speaker

Co-Chair

Chi-Chang Lin

National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan

Speaker
Biography:

Murad Abu-Farsakh is Research Professor, Louisiana Transportation Research Center, Louisiana State University. He received his Ph.D. in Geotechnical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 1997. He published more than 150 peer review articles. Some of his research interests include Evaluation of pile setup for piles driven in clayey soils Accelerated load testing of geosynthetic reinforced base layer in pavement sections Calibration of resistance factors for use in the LRFD design of driven piles and drilled shafts Numerical modeling and finite element analysis of geotechnical, pavement and soi-structure interaction engineering problems, Instrumentation and many

Abstract:

The Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (LA DOTD) has initiated a major effort to minimize the bridge end bump problem associated with the differential settlement. As a result, a new design for the approach slab was proposed, which requires increasing the slab flexural rigidity (EI), and using reinforced soil foundation (RSF) to support the slab and traffic loads at the roadway pavement/approach slab joint (R/S joint). The Bayou Courtableau Bridge was selected as a demonstration project to monitor, evaluate, validate, and verify the new bridge approach slab design method. The west approach slab was designed using the proposed design method with slab thickness of 406 mm (16 in.), while the east approach slab was designed using the traditional design method with slab thickness of 305 mm (12 in.). The pavement end side of the west approach slab was supported by a 1.2-m (4.0-ft.) wide strip footing with the soil underneath it was reinforced by six geogrid layers placed at a vertical spacing of 305 mm (12 in). Two static load tests were conducted on both the west and east approach slabs at two different times after construction. The test results indicated that the west approach slab (with new design) lost most of its supports from the soil; while the east approach slab (with traditional design) began losing its contacts from the soil, starting from the bridge side towards the pavement side, after about a year and half. The roughness profiles demonstrated better performance of the new approach slab system with much lower International Roughness Index (IRI) values. The field monitoring program at Bayou Courtableau Bridge demonstrated much better performance of the new approach slab design system (west approach slab) compared to the traditional design (east approach slab).

Speaker
Biography:

Amir Poursaee is an Assistant Professor of Materials Engineering in Glenn Department of Civil Engineering at the Clemson University, where he teaches courses in infrastructure corrosion construction materials, and non-destructive evaluations (NDE). He has published more than 30 peer-reviewed papers, monographs, book and book chapters.

Abstract:

Using crushed bricks as coarse aggregates in concrete is of particular interest to preserve natural aggregate sources as well as to reduce waste and waste storage. The objective of this experimental work was to study the durability of reinforced concrete made with crushed brick as aggregate. Concrete made with brick aggregates showed an increase in its workability compared to that in concrete with natural aggregate. The improvement in workability enhanced with an increase in coarse brick aggregate content. Concrete samples made with brick aggregates showed slight improvement in compressive strength compared to that in concrete made with 100% natural aggregate. By increasing the brick content, the resistance to chloride penetration decreased due to the higher porosity and absorption in brick aggregates compared to those in natural aggregates. All samples were able to pass the 300 cycles of the freeze/thaw tests. Corrosion of the reinforcing steel bars in samples containing brick as their coarse aggregates initiated before that in samples with natural aggregates. Therefore, based on the data and results found in this study, it can be concluded that natural coarse aggregates can be replaced by crushed bricks, without significant change in the durability of concrete when the steel is not present. However, when concrete is reinforced with steel, replacing natural aggregates with crushed brick is not recommended.

Chi-Chang Lin

National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan

Title: Multiple tuned mass dampers for vibration control of high-rise buildings

Time : 12:30-12:55

Speaker
Biography:

Chi-Chang Lin received his Ph.D. degree in Civil Engineering at the State University of New York at Buffalo in February 1989 and joined the Department of Civil Engineering at National Chung Hsing University (NCHU) in Taiwan in August 1989. He has been a Distinguished Professor since 2007. Dr. Lin was the Department Chair of Civil Engineering, Dean of College of Engineering, Founding Director of Center for Environmental Restoration and Disaster Reduction, and Vice President of NCHU. His research interests include structural health monitoring and damage assessment, passive and active control of structures, earthquake engineering, and train- or man-induced vibration control. Dr. Lin has received numeral awards and honors including Distinguished Research Award from Taiwan National Science Council three times and the Outstanding Engineering Professor Award from Taiwan Chinese Institute of Engineers. He has published one book chapter and over 150 peer-reviewed technical papers in international scientific Journals and Conferences. He is currently President of the Chinese Society of Structural Engineers and a life-time Fellow of both the Chinese Institute of Civil and Hydraulic Engineering and the Chinese Society of Structural Engineers in Taiwan.

Abstract:

vibration control of long-period high-rise buildings against wind and seismic loadings has been a hot topic in the field of structural engineering to assure structure safety and human confort. Single tuned mass damper (TMD) is one kind of passive-type devices and has been successfully installed in many high-rise buildings, observatory towers, and long-span bridges since 1971. It can be incorporated into an existing structure with less interference than other devices. Multiple Tuned Mass Dampers (MTMD) consist of multiple units of tuned mass dampers arranged in parallel to suppress vibrations of single or multiple modes of a structure. A brand-new optimal MTMD system was developed by the authors to provide broader frequency bandwidth than single TMD, and thus, to be able to endure large variation of controlled structural frequency (called frequency detuning effect). In this study, a friction typed MTMD system with three units of TMD was designed and fabricated. A series of shaking table tests for a scaled-down long-period building model equipped with the MTMD system and a stop/lock device were conducted to prove the control effectiveness of the MTMD system and the workability of the stop/lock device. The results demonstrate that analytical results agree well with the experimental results showing accurate analytical friction model. The proposed MTMD system is effective in reducing the dynamic responses of the target high-rise building. In addition, the stop/lock device works well when the stroke of each TMD unit exceeds its limit.

Muhd Zaimi Abd Majid

Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Malaysia

Title: Nanosilicon as a smart waterproofing admixture in cement base material

Time : 12:55-13:20

Speaker
Biography:

Muhd Zaimi Abd Majid is Research Dean of Construction Research Alliance, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Malaysia. He has published more than 100 peer-reviewed papers, in national and international Journals.

Abstract:

Permeation of water as well as other fluids in concrete can result in degradation and other fouling aesthetic problems which shorten concrete structures’ life. Several research studies have been undertaken to produce waterproofing additives that will extend the service life of concrete elements. Consequently, a great deal of repair and maintenance costs can be avoided. The aim of this research is to develop a smart waterproof cement base material using nano silicon. The material is being characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), Energy dispersion Spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier Transmission Infrared (FTIR), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Water Contact Angle Test (WCA). Different amount of nanosilicon suspension is added to mortar during mixing to obtain the optimum quantity. From this study, the result shows that capillary water absorption has been reduced by 55% as compared to control specimen. Also the admixture has increased the slump of the mortar by 19mm (12%). Other necessary tests such as sorptivity, water vapor permeability, ultrasonic pulse velocity, compressive strength and carbonation will be conducted to establish the effect of nanosilicon. Furthermore, microstructure would be conducted to maximize the reliability of the results. In conclusion, nanosilicon is a good waterproofing admixture.

Break: Lunch Break @ Benjamins 13:20-14:00

Rashid Rashidzadeh

University of Windsor, Canada

Title: Smart sensors and 3D IC technology

Time : 14:00-14:25

Speaker
Biography:

Rashid Rashidzadeh (M’04–SM’13) received the B.S.E.E. degree from Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran, and the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada in 2003 and 2007 respectively. He has track record of successful collaboration with industry and has supervised many industry projects, the industry systems designed by his research team have entered the market successfully. He is currently manager of Research Centre for Integrated Microsystems (RCIM) and adjunct professor with the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Windsor. His research focuses on design and test methodologies for analog/RF cores, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) and wireless sensor networks for distributed sensing. He is the chair of IEEE circuits and systems and computer joint societies chapter in Windsor section and is the recipient of Excellence in Scholarship, Research & Creative Activity award at the University of Windsor in 2015.

Abstract:

Full integration of all blocks and functions of a smart sensor into a single chip with current technologies is a challenging task. In addition to the sensor unit numerous blocks including interface unit, Analog to Digital Converter (ADC), processing unit and wireless communication element are needed to implement a smart sensor. Innovative technologies from diverse disciplines such as microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and photonics bring new possibilities for integration of smart sensors while further raising the challenges of integration. 3D and 2.5D fabrication technologies are well suited for integration of smart sensors containing elements from various technology disciplines such as MEMS, microelectronics. This work presents the integration techniques in 3D IC technology to achieve low power and high performance smart sensors.

Ji Ma

Kent State University, USA

Title: smartmateriNovel technologies and future developments of MEMS-based displaysals

Time : 14:25-14:50

Speaker
Biography:

Ji Ma received PhD at Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2006 and his BS at Changchun University of Science and Technology in 2000. Currently, he is a Group Lead and Senior R&D Scientist at Qualcomm Inc. for MEMS-based display technology. He is also active at Liquid Crystal Institute, Kent State University for novel display technologies from 2008. He has been working in liquid crystal displays and MEMS displays in both academia and industry. He has published 3 book chapters, more than 40 peer-reviewed papers and more than 20 patents.

Abstract:

Display technologies in mobile, tablet, laptop, desktop and TV have been used from day to day. As a new member of display technologies, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)-based displays, compared with traditional display mode like LCD and OLED, show merits on optical performance, color performance and energy-saving. In this talk, different display modes of available MEME-based display technologies, such as digital micromirror device (DMD), digital micro-shutter (DMS), interferometric modulator display (IMOD), time multiplexed optical shutter (TMOS) and grating light valve (GLV) and their operational concepts as well device principals for transmissive, reflective and projection displays are presented. These devices are achieved by controlling light by transmittance, reflective or diffraction behaviors. The issues in the reliability tests are stressed and the solution for these problems are presented. The challenge and new opportunities on material science involved in MEMS technologies are proposed.

Ju-Hyung Kim

Pukyong National University, Republic of Korea

Title: Solvent-free fluidic organic distributed feedback lasers via soft-lithography

Time : 14:50-15:15

Speaker
Biography:

Ju-Hyung Kim received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in Chemical and Biological Engineering from Seoul National University, Republic of Korea, in 2007, and the Ph.D. degree in Advanced Materials Science from the University of Tokyo, Japan in 2012, working on organic semiconductors and organic/metal interfaces. Since 2014, he has been an Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering at Pukyong National University, Republic of Korea. His research interest includes surface engineering and analysis on organic thin films, organic electronic and optoelectronic applications, and unconventional lithography methodology.

Abstract:

Liquid organic semiconductors present strong advantages over conventional organic semiconductors in solid-state thin films, such as solvent-free device processing, ultimate mechanical flexibility and uniformity, and tunable optoelectronic responses. In a lasing context, these fluidic semiconducting materials can provide an excellent framework for flexible and tunable lasers if proper resonator structures and materials are used. Particularly since distributed feedback (DFB) structures show outstanding properties for lasing such as low threshold, high optical mode confinement, and high reflectivity, the compact integration of DFB grating structures into solvent-free optofluidic organic light-emitting devices is of strong interest for the development of tunable solvent-free liquid lasers with low lasing threshold. Here optically-pumped low-threshold blue, green and red liquid DFB lasers using solvent-free fluidic organic semiconductors and flexible polymeric substrates patterned with DFB gratings are presented. Experimental results also indicate that a tuning of the flexible liquid DFB laser emission peak can be achieved under mechanical bending, due to the high-aspect-ratio DFB grating pattern which causes largely diversified periods according to the mechanical deformation. Overall, the results strongly suggest great potential for a wide range of optoelectronic applications including data communications, highly sensitive bio- and chemical sensors, and portable analytic instruments.

M Habib Ullah

University of Malaya, Malaysia

Title: A new biodegradable organic dielectric substrate for planar antenna design

Time : 15:15-15:40

Speaker
Biography:

M Habib Ullah is a Post-Doctoral Reseach Fellow in the department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Malaya, where he is a active member of Electromagnetic Radiation and Devices Research Group (EMRD). He has published more than 80 peer-reviewed papers, monographs, and book chapters. He has awared national and international prizes for his research contributions.

Abstract:

Synthesis and experimental analysis of an organic biodegradable Polybutylene succinate (PBS) based dielectric material for microwave application is presented in this paper. Due to the exceptional mechanical and high thermal deformation features, the proposed silica aerogel nanoparticle extracted from rice husk integrated with PBS has become a potential replacement of traditional polypropylene (PP) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). For experimental verification of the proposed biodegradable organic dielectric material, a new dual band yagi-like antenna is presented for Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) reader and Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) applications. The designed antenna is comprised of 0.17λ×0.13λ radiating patch fed a 10 mm long 2 mm wide microstrip line and reduced ground plane. The antenna is fabricated on the proposed copper laminated 1.25 mm thick biodegradable organic dielectric substrate (εr=4.5). The performance of the prototype was tested in a standard far field anechoic measurement chamber the results show that 27.78% and 23.4% bandwidths with maximum gains of 4.95 dBi and 7.26 dBi have achieved in lower and upper band respectively. Configuration of driving elements, director and the pairs of folded arm between excitation point and the driven element was optimized that reduces the length of driving poles significantly. Nearly stable radiation characteristics with proper impedance matching make the proposed antenna appropriate for universal portable RFID reader with WLAN functionality.

Break: Coffee Break @ Foyer 15:40-16:00

Bartłomiej Andrzejewski

Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland

Title: Cu-Nb nanofilamental superconducting wires and nanostructured alloys

Time : 16:00-16:25

Speaker
Biography:

Bartłomiej Andrzejewski is an Associated Professor and head of the Department of Ferroelectrics at the Institute of Molecular Physics Polish Academy of Sciences. His research interests focus on ferroelectrics, multiferroics, magnetic nanomaterials and on superconductivity. He teaches courses at the Institute of Molecular Physics and at Poznań University of Technology in solid state physics and superconductivity. Has published more than 100 peer-reviewed papers, and is a co-author of a few patent pending.

Abstract:

Recent advances in nanofabrication of superconducting nanowires provided excellent platforms for basic research and also test systems for applications of superconductors in confined geometries. Superconducting nanowires with diameters comparable to the superconducting coherence length become one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures that exhibit unique properties like, thermal and quantum phase slips, an “antiproximity effect”, “row” vortex lattices, mini-gap state, resistance fluctuations, shape-dependent superconducting resonances and many others. In his report we present a cold plastic working fabrication method of Cu–Nb nanocomposites by means of multiple steps of compacting and drawing of Nb rods in Cu tubes. The number of wires in these composites increases in geometric progression during subsequent drawings, which results in reduction of Nb filament cross-section. In this way, wires with the diameter 150 m, having more than 820,000 niobium nanofilaments of a diameter between 100 and 200 nm and hexagonally distributed in a pure copper matrix were produced. The superconducting composites exhibited enhanced critical currents determined mainly by surface vortex pinning, critical temperature close to the bulk Nb and microwave absorption due to vortex lattice motion or phase slips at Nb-Cu-Nb Josephson junctions. Other superconducting wires were fabricated by cold plastic working of Cu–Nb alloys. The nanostructure of these Cu-Nb superconducting fine wires of a diameter 87 m was irregular with niobium particles of globular shape and narrow filaments of the niobium-rich phase. In spite of this drawback the wires derived from Cu–Nb alloys exhibited advantageous mechanical properties and relatively high electrical conductivity.

Speaker
Biography:

Minh Duc Nguyen received his PhD in 2010 in Physics from University of Twente, The Netherlands. He is a Postdoctoral researcher in University of Twente. His current research focuses on various piezoelectric MEMS devices, concentrates on piezoelectric micro-diaphragms and micro-cantilevers for micro-fluidics and micro-biosensors applications. These devices are based on the epitaxial- and polycrystalline lead-based thin films, such as Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) and 0.67Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.33PbTiO3 (PMN-PT), and lead-free thin films such as Ba(Sr,Ti)O3 (BST), BaTiO3 (BTO), K0.5Na0.5NbO3 (KNN) and Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3 (BNT), fabricated on Si wafers using pulse laser deposition (PLD) and sol-gel techniques.

Abstract:

Ferroelectric oxides, such as Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 (PZT), are very useful for electronic and photonic devices, as well as piezomechanical actuators and sensors. The ferro- and piezo-electric properties are strongly related to the crystal orientation as well as the crystal growth of the epitaxial PZT thin films. Successful integration of these devices into silicon technology is therefore not only dependent on the ability of crystal growth on silicon substrates, but also the control of the crystallographic orientation of the deposited PZT thin film. In this study, the all-oxide piezoelectric stacks (PZT thin films are sandwiched between oxide-electrodes) were grown on buffer-layers/silicon substrates using pulsed laser deposition. The microcantilever structures (length: 400 µm and width: 100 µm) consisting of a piezoelectric stack (electrode/PZT/electrode) grown on a seed-layer buffered 10-µm thick Si supporting beam were then fabricated by backside etching of a silicon-on-insulator wafer. The piezoelectric measurements show that the (110)-oriented PZT films with columnar grain structure have a higher longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient d33,f but smaller transverse piezoelectric coefficient d31,f of the (001)-oriented films with dense structure or without the clear columnar growth structure. This finding indicates that the piezoelectric properties can be changed by changing the density of the PZT. It is very important for choosing the proper film growth orientation for specific applications which require either a large in-plane (such as piezoelectric micro-machined ultrasonic transducers, micro-diaphragms and energy harvester) or out-of-plane (such as mirror structure for ultraviolet wavelengths) piezoelectric displacement.